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The Ghost of Surveys Past

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Ghost of Surveys PastThere are just some things you shouldn’t attempt to do on your own. No matter how ‘good’ you think you might be. Let’s consider this… as a business owner; would you ever do the taxes for your business? How about handle all of your legal needs?

Absolutely not! And if you’re shaking your head, ‘yeah, maybe,’ then perhaps a sports analogy will change your mind. Would you attempt to dunk the basketball when you have Lebron James on your team? Didn’t think so. And this is EXACTLY why you should hire someone else to do your company survey. There is an undeniable value in leveraging employee surveys to an outside party versus building and executing in-house. These include:

•  Increased Participation: Employees are more likely to participate if they feel as though their leaders took the process seriously enough to hire an outside party to execute the task efficiently and correctly. And believe me; you want your employees to participate. According to Gallup, engaged employees have a 3.9 times higher earnings per share rate than employees who aren’t engaged. Keep them engaged, and give them the confidence that the survey will be done properly; especially if they were conducted poorly in the past.

•  Increased Confidentiality: You can tell your people that your in-house survey is ‘anonymous’ all you want, but I think you’d have an easier time convincing them that they’re all getting raises. Employees are usually hesitant to be honest for fear that anonymity will be compromised. By allowing a third party to conduct your survey, confidentiality and anonymity are secured. This allows employees to open up and provide that candid feedback you crave.

•  The Ability to Benchmark: Utilizing a third party offers the opportunity to understand how you stack up to other companies. Particularly in terms of employee engagement. And don’t forget, this cannot be done if the survey is built and executed in-house.

•  Leverage Expertise: There are many ways that a poorly written survey questionnaire can lead to insufficient or false data. Question miswording is a common trap that those who are untrained in survey research fall into. eQ is an expert in creating surveys that are customized for our clients that incorporate best practices (in terms of survey design) and deployment.

•  Make the Survey and Data Collection Matter: Many companies that do their own surveys are unsure how to leverage the data collected to create sustainable change. The best way to create this change is through a third-party system. A third party can help develop post-survey communication, ensure the survey was meaningful, and build an action plan to create organizational change around the areas that need attention.

Perhaps now that you’ve familiarized yourself with the many positives of third party surveys you’ll consider one next time you contemplate dusting off the old, antiquated survey you’ve been Xeroxing and reusing for years. Trust me; these surveys are ghosts of the past. They’re floppy disks in a flash drive world. If you’re tired of the status quo, if you’re done distributing in-house surveys with poor feedback, it’s time to take a step forward and experience real results when someone else does your survey.

 

Misti Aaronson is the COO of entreQuest. She utilizes her talents and expertise from working with countless organizations to help businesses grow through expert talent acquisition, growth methodology and development of their teams.

Posted in Business Strategy, Employee Experience, Grow Regardless, Leadership, Success | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Bad Dieting

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Donut“Thank-yous” and Praise, Empty Verbal Calories Without the Nutritional Value of Specifics

People who know me well know that many of my favorite analogies involve food. So, it’s not surprising when my first thoughts about empty compliments and encouragements go right to thoughts of junk food. eQ’s COO, Misti Aaronson (one of Baltimore’s top female executives because of her commitment to excellence – her own and developing the abilities of those around her to deliver the same), is way more food conscious and disciplined than I. Excluding our banter about our differing views on the merits of so-called “participation trophies,” I think we’re going to agree when it comes to this topic; and the analogy to illustrate it. As I’ve said before, when used in the right way, with the right audience, the token of these participation trophies can positively impact the individuals you’re seeking to draw further into your community. I said then, and I’ll repeat here: they’re good to attract and lower defenses; they do not replace hard work, achievement, and the esteem that comes with it. The fact that self-esteem has to follow achievement has been studied and written about for years. Recently, while flying across the US, I read an article reminding me of this. It made me think of Misti and others like her who want to have a real and lasting impact on the people around them. I was inspired to cull out a few simple things to know and use for all of us to be more effective when it comes to supporting others in meaningful ways through what we say. To paraphrase the great children’s lesson, you can give a colleague a … doughnut of hollow praise, or you can provide a well-balanced diet that will help them reach and sustain a higher level of contribution. Sure, the doughnut tastes good, but it’s what happens as a result of a steady diet of “doughnuts” that matters.

The inspiring article I’m reading on the place is called “In Criticism of Praise” by Heidi Stevens, a Chicago Tribune columnist, author and parent. The article appears in the January 2015 issue of Southwest Airlines in flight magazine. Ms. Stevens’ focus is on her relationship with her son and parent/child relationships overall, but the lessons transcend age and connection. She cites liberally from the research of Stanford psychology professor, Carol Dweck, who studied the affect of praise, success, and failure on children, and their willingness to take on challenges and the attitude with which they do so. One way of summarizing her work is to say that too much praise for too little achievement (that fails to include a reference to the effort) leads to a resistance to take on greater challenges for fear of losing one’s status. More specifically, calling someone a genius for performing simple addition, or the next great runner for making it all the way around the block, doesn’t produce the results you intend. In fact, it can lead to anxiety and create the equivalent of a “proving” versus a “learning” mindset in which failure is not an option.

Fittingly, in the same magazine, there was an article discussing the true story of a team of high school students from a tough neighborhood in Phoenix who bested a team from MIT in an underwater robotics competition. (Keep an eye out for the upcoming movie version of Spare Parts, which tells the story of the Carl Hayden High School robotics team.) One of the assertions by the author is that these kids performed so well because they figured they had no chance to win. Another factor was that their lack of access to expensive technology and other resources led them to be far more innovative…and, ultimately, incredibly successful.

So, what does all this mean? Should we reserve praise and support? Maybe practice verbal tough love? There’s no research that suggests withholding praise or employing negative reinforcement is the preferred method of creating, or furthering, behaviors that you desire. What about participation trophies? Read my earlier blog. Damning with faint praise? Well…sort of. You do run the risk of missing an opportunity to get more of what you want if you don’t make what you value and appreciate perfectly clear. The message from these articles serves as a healthy reminder that we can be most effective with our compliments when we are:

•  Genuine—Pick something to praise or reinforce that merits attention. For some, even modest achievement or progress is appropriate; for others, it may need to be more substantial or noteworthy. You have to believe it for them too – this isn’t just a mantra, it’s neuroscience.

•  Timely—To borrow from the NYC safety initiative: if you see something, say something. The most effective time to share feedback of any sort is as close to the time the behavior occurs as possible. If it’s a subordinate, act at will. If it’s a peer, ask the person if s/he is interested in feedback. Share your thoughts in person (if you can); notes and trinkets can be effective too – as long as you attend to the most important element of specificity (noted below).

•  Specific—Be sure to say what it is that merits the “good job” or “thanks” you pass along. It sounds like a simple thing; but, too often, the details are overlooked or it’s assumed the person knows what you’re thanking them for. Adding the precise reasons for your assessment capitalizes on your ability to create confidence and increase the likelihood of getting more what you value.

One last thing: all feedback should be constructive. The number of times I hear people say they share “positive or constructive” feedback is telling. It communicates exactly the issue discussed above: we aren’t constructive when we praise. Not to mention, that construction is reserved for outlining areas in need of address or development. By applying the guidance that all feedback is constructive, you’ll be more effective on at least two levels:

1.  You’ll praise more often, and

2.  Your praise will have significantly more meaning and impact

Jeff Lesher, Principal at entreQuest, blends his deep knowledge of organization design, human capital, and leadership with a pragmatic approach drawn from his own business experience and eQ’s philosophy to help eQ’s clients focus on their core purpose and move people effectively to action.

Posted in Leadership, Motivation, Success, System of Management | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

I’d Like to Thank the Academy

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I'd Like to Thank the AcademyMy high school English teacher always used to tell me (more scold me) to never start a paper with a quote. So today, I’d like to start my blog with a quote – Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the famous theologian and staunch opponent of Fascism and National Socialism, once wrote:

It’s a strange feeling to be so completely dependent on other people; but at least it teaches one to be grateful, and I hope I shall never forget that. In ordinary life we hardly realize that we receive a great deal more than we give, and that it is only with gratitude that life becomes rich. It’s very easy to overestimate the importance of our own achievements in comparison with what we owe to others.”

Ever since reading Bonhoeffer’s “Letters and Papers from Prison” I have been amazed and inspired by the spirit of graciousness and optimism he demonstrated in the face of extreme difficulty.

Gratitude is not a new topic on the pages of the eQ blogs, but I feel it’s pertinent to revisit something as simple, yet fundamentally crucial as gratitude. Expressing gratitude to the people who lend a helping hand in your development seems like a no-brainer, but it is often overlooked and definitely underrated. No matter how great your personal or professional achievements are, it’s always a shared effort with the people who support you and even encourage you along the way.

If you love movies like I do, then you know the Oscar’s are coming up. And what’s the one line that everyone who wins an award utters from behind the microphone? “I’d like to thank the Academy.” That’s right, even the biggest of celebrity A-listers take the time to express their gratitude for the people who got them to that stage. No one ever stands up there and says, “I’d like to thank myself, I did it all on my own.”

No matter who you are, or how wonderful you are at what you do, you owe a great big debt of gratitude and a giant thank you to the people who were there in support to get you to where you are. This is why I urge you to give acknowledgment to your team after big successes. Show your appreciativeness to the hard working people behind the scenes. Those people are an indispensible instrument of success. Believe me, a thank you and a pat on the back goes a long way. And I’m willing to bet you’ll see greater enthusiasm and a more determined attitude out of them as well. As for me, I’d like to thank the “academy” of people who have helped to get me to where I am today. I’ve always had an incredible support team at my disposal. It’s best not to lose sight of yours.

Like Bonhoeffer said, “It is only with gratitude that life becomes rich.” Enrich your life, pour out some gratitude.

 

As eQ’s Writing Specialist, Eric Stewart works his creative magic by putting our Team’s concepts, ideas, and methodologies into words!

Posted in Gratitude, Grow Regardless, Motivation, Success | Tagged | Leave a comment

Be Nice Networking

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Be ThankfulYou check your LinkedIn and yet another recruiter wants to connect with you. Depending on the status of your job, many things run through your head. However, the courtesy of what you should do, or how you should respond, may not. As a Talent Acquisition Manager, I reach out to people in hopes of connecting them with their dream job. But, admittedly, I have a tendency to be a bit bias. That being said, I’d like to offer a few different ways in which you can interpret and respond to messages from recruiters!

Be Thankful! I look at hundreds of resumes and LinkedIn profiles a week! The fact I wanted to connect with you and send you a message should mean a lot to you! Always thank the recruiter or the hiring manager for wanting to connect and hoping to talk with you about an opportunity.

Don’t be rude. You’re having a bad day at work and you don’t want to be nice. Well, you never know when your bad day could turn into a bad job. You just may need that connection for a new job. It’s okay to be direct, but don’t be rude!

Think outside of the box. Just because you don’t need a job, that doesn’t mean your friend couldn’t use one. Think about your network. Now think about what you have in common; jobs, likes, dislikes, career aspirations? That is why I “would love to network with you!” Use this as a time to help someone else, and connect us.

Don’t burn the bridge. I am going to tell you something you will not want to hear. There is going to come a time when you will need a new job. When this time arises you’re more likely to ask people you know. That means your social network. Now all of a sudden that one recruiter who reached out to you a year ago pops into your head. Now is when you’ll be glad you were nice and didn’t burn the bridge!

To most professional networkers these tips seem like common sense, but you would be shocked to learn that it isn’t! It takes one second to be nice to someone, and two seconds to be mean. You must treat others in the way you would want to be treated. You never know if the next time a recruiter reaches out if it will be your dream job, or a dream job for a friend. Either way I hope you will take my advice and think twice before you respond!

 

As a Talent Consultant, Jonna Faulise focuses on finding the right candidates to fit our clients’ needs. She works with our clients to understand the exact skills and attributes that would fit with the cultural climate and their environment.

Posted in Hiring Best Practices, LinkedIn, Recruiting, Talent, Talent Acquisition | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Selecting Elite Talent, Part V: The Talent eQuation

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Talent eQuationToday marks the final part of eQ’s first blog series on elite talent. (Cue sad music.) Part V of our series discusses one of our biggest philosophies: the Talent eQuation.

Selection is just one part of the eQ Talent eQuation. Talent is fundamental to experiencing full growth and performance. Returning to the example used earlier in the week: the Navy SEALs set the standard for talent selection and could not take talent selection more seriously. According to a recent survey undertaken by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the number one challenge facing companies today is the ability to attract and retain top talent. So, how do we do it when we know that the job description is dead? And how can we create a common definition of good so that we can set up an effective process to select and retain top talent based on an outcomes based approach? In selecting top talent, your company must employ a more consultative approach and not fall prey to poor predictors. Instead, let the job talk, and identify key accountabilities and assess the job and talent, both existing and new. Make sure your company has a common definition of what ‘good’ is and can implement an ideal candidate profile, coaching guides, and an outcome based approach to selection. It’s all about talent!

We hope you enjoyed our first eQ blog series! Continue to stop in and check out our regular blog posts, and be sure to keep an eye out for our next series.

 

As Vice President at entreQuest, Chris Steer works closely with the eQ principals to develop and execute on eQ’s strategic growth plan to expand and position eQ as a leader in talent acquisition, growth, and management consulting.

Posted in Grow Regardless, growth, Success, Talent, Talent Acquisition, Team Members | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selecting Elite Talent, Part IV: The Assessment Sciences

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The final puzzle pieceAdmit it; you’ve been waiting all day for Part IV of our eQ blog series on elite talent! Well, wait no longer. As promised, today, we’ll take you beyond the benchmark and into the assessment sciences.

Beyond the benchmark of what the job is, and what a common definition of ‘good’ is, there are several critical pieces that must be considered when selecting top talent. Assessing candidates is imperative to get the complete picture of each individual’s profile. Beyond intelligence, cultural fit, and experience; individuals bring a unique combination of attitudes, behaviors, emotional intelligence, and skills to the job. (And if you’ve been a frequent reader of our blogs you know how important emotional intelligence can be)! Each of these factors has a direct impact on performance and determining whether the employee is average or exceptional in that particular role. While a person’s behavioral profile is crucial for determining that they are an appropriate fit for the job, it’s a mistake to rely on behavioral match only. Just as hiring candidates with prior relevant experience is not enough to guarantee top performance, assessments that only describe workplace behaviors are not inclusive enough to most accurately predict potential performance. Hiring managers commonly hire for behavior only, or rely on poor predictors. This isn’t always the best avenue to take. A comprehensive assessment process includes an analysis of the underlying attitudes and world view that motivate a person to action.

My recommendation: stick with the assessment sciences. Think of your organization as a puzzle and the job opening as your missing piece; stop jamming the wrong piece into the open hole just because you like the way it looks. You need the right piece to complete the puzzle, not the piece with the best resume.

Come back tomorrow for the final installment of our eQ blog series on elite talent where we tackle the talent eQuation.

 

As Vice President at entreQuest, Chris Steer works closely with the eQ principals to develop and execute on eQ’s strategic growth plan to expand and position eQ as a leader in talent acquisition, growth, and management consulting.

Posted in Emotional Intelligence, Grow Regardless, growth, Talent, Talent Acquisition, Team Members | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selecting Elite Talent, Part III: What’s a ‘Good’ Benchmark?

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Star RatingsWelcome back for Part III of our eQ blog series on elite talent!

As we were discussing yesterday, the benchmarking process serves as an opportunity to realign each position with the most up-to-date strategic business initiatives for your organization. The team will clarify why the job exists and how it fits into the company’s strategy going forward. As key accountabilities are defined, weighed and prioritized, a clear picture emerges. The behaviors, values, personal skills and task preferences required for success in the position can now be used to screen a suitable candidate. An additional outcome from the process is that benchmarking may also close past accountability gaps between positions that gave rise to recurring efficiencies in communication or productivity. It’s important to assess the existing team against the benchmarks produced so that any gaps in the current team can be accounted for when planning for new positions, training or succession. Once jobs are benchmarked, the critical competencies and attributes required for each job are used as guidelines, both for hiring and for training high potentials to excel.

There is quite a big distinction between a benchmark and a ‘good’ benchmark. It’s best to err on the side of caution with this one and put a lot of time and effort into developing good benchmark standards. Otherwise you run the risk of missing the mark on your initial goal of selecting elite talent. Without good benchmarks, there’s a big chance you will fall very short of elite.

Please join us again tomorrow for Part IV of the eQ blog series Selecting Elite Talent. Tomorrow we go a step beyond benchmarks, into the world of The Assessment Sciences.

 

As Vice President at entreQuest, Chris Steer works closely with the eQ principals to develop and execute on eQ’s strategic growth plan to expand and position eQ as a leader in talent acquisition, growth, and management consulting.

Posted in Grow Regardless, growth, Talent, Talent Acquisition, Team Members | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selecting Elite Talent, Part II: A Better Plan

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SEALs climbingIf you were with us yesterday then you’ll remember that when tasked with picking the best, most elite, representation of a team the consensus at eQ was the Navy SEALs. What better image evokes feelings of resolve, determination, teamwork, problem solving, and overcoming all obstacles than the SEALs?

To select your elite talent, you have to start with a better plan. You need to start benchmarking.

Don’t you think the SEALs know what the ‘job’ looks like; what the key accountabilities are? Don’t you think they know what ‘good’ is for their organization? Don’t you think they know how to measure high performance after thousands of missions? The SEALs let the job talk! Over decades of battle tested engagements, the SEALs identify an ideal candidate. They benchmarked it after every mission. What worked and why? Who worked and why? And we should shape our training and selection process to then measure the talent against it.

Recent data reveals that benchmarking and assessments can lead to 92% retention of new hires. Nonetheless, we know that organizations are scared to make a bad hire because of the economic impact of a bad hire. We also know that the job description is dead as an effective means of framing the position and what it requires. Bill Bonnstetter, founder of Target Training International and leading thinker on the talent landscape, states that job benchmarking will secure the talent necessary for success while eliminating common biases often associated with the hiring process. An accurate job benchmarking process is a unique and effective solution because it benchmarks a specific job, not the person in the job. To do this, Bonnstetter suggests that we let the job talk through an interactive process and job assessment. Bonnstetter believes that when job benchmarking is implemented properly, it will have a direct effect on your business’ bottom line. You will not only attract the best candidates but you will save time and money by hiring the right people the first time and reducing the learning curve with new employees who are strategically matched to fit your company.

As you can see, benchmarking is key! Return tomorrow for Part III of our eQ blog series on elite talent to discover what is ‘good’ when it comes to benchmarking.

 

As Vice President at entreQuest, Chris Steer works closely with the eQ principals to develop and execute on eQ’s strategic growth plan to expand and position eQ as a leader in talent acquisition, growth, and management consulting.

Posted in Grow Regardless, growth, Success, Talent, Talent Acquisition, Team Members | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

eQ Blog Series: Selecting Elite Talent, Part I

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Recruitment Concept - Qualified CandidateIs there anything more important for your organization than hiring the right people? Growth depends on sourcing and assessing the right candidates and getting those candidates to join your organization. So, once you are able to attract talent to your organization, but before you start to focus on retention and engagement, you have to select and hire!!

Who can we look to as inspiration for elite selection? Who’s the best? Members of the eQ team recently convened to ponder the following question: What or whom comes to mind when you think about the most elite and high performing teams, groups, or companies across any category? Interestingly, the majority of those in attendance provided the same answer—the Navy SEALs.

How does an organization select talent to meet such a lofty standard as the SEALs? No organization can create a selection environment like the SEALs’ Indoctrination (Indoc) and Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) process, but that should not prevent an organization from developing its own best practice approach to talent selection. The primary takeaway from research into SEAL selection is that team mindset and culture are paramount. There is an unwavering commitment to selecting those candidates that believe what the SEALs believe, and that belief is instilled immediately. No human being will put themselves through the mental and physical rigor of SEAL training unless they believe in what they are seeking to attain with an unrelenting fervor.

How can organizations select elite talent? An effective talent selection process ensures that your talent strategies support, and align with, your overall business strategy and culture. An effective talent approach also produces a best practice mindset to talent selection with key accountabilities and data-driven assessments as core best practices, in order to find rock stars with the right DNA for your culture.

There are 4 pivotal steps to selecting elite talent for your organization. Join us every day this week for eQ’s first ever blog series. This month’s series will provide you with one step a day on finding the best of the best for your team. Check back in tomorrow for an in depth analysis on finding A Better Plan.

 

As Vice President at entreQuest, Chris Steer works closely with the eQ principals to develop and execute on eQ’s strategic growth plan to expand and position eQ as a leader in talent acquisition, growth, and management consulting.

Posted in Grow Regardless, Success, Talent, Talent Acquisition, Team Members | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Little Big Part of Scalability

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successI’ve been a part of the entreQuest team for almost three months now, and I have enjoyed every single second of my transition into the management consulting industry. It has been an amazing and exciting experience to be a part of this growing cultural movement. From day one, I was very cognizant of, and focused on, our processes (internal and external), and how we and our clients can become more scalable. More specifically, creating that seamless client and employee onboarding experience. The experience shouldn’t be any different whether you’re onboarding ten clients/employees or just one individual. As a leader, it really makes you think:

1.  How are we going to keep up with demand?

2.  What needs to improve?

3.  What can we proactively do to get out of our own growth’s way?

4.  How will we maintain our quality work if we keep getting more business?

The faster your business grows, the more the process becomes a recurring, higher priority. This doesn’t mean creativity or innovation gets thrown out the window. Those things are necessary to thrive in this ever-changing world. But remember, the industry you’re in isn’t going to slow down for you, nor does it care to.

However your business makes money, the onboarding process is one in the same; whoever you’re working for (clients) and whoever works for you (employees). There should be no favorites. At the very least make it seem as if there aren’t. One of the main philosophies we preach here at entreQuest is treating your employees like your clients, and clients like your employees.

You want your clients/customers to have a positive and memorable experience. If they do, odds are they will refer their network as a result of the trust you built. The bigger your book of business gets, the more important it is to have a smooth and seamless process for your client onboarding, and the lifecycle of that particular relationship.

The larger your business gets, the more employees you will need to support that load; and the more employees within your company, the more important the onboarding process becomes. Essentially, the quicker your employees are acclimated, the happier your employees become, the harder they work, and the more they care. In turn, these authentic, happy, hard-working employees refer people with the same qualities and values.

In the end, the bigger your company gets, the more important it is to have processes in place to make your organization scalable. Having these processes in place sets up your organization for success and growth. Being scalable is a huge part of how fast your business grows. If you can’t keep up with the market while maintaining quality, someone else will. Don’t lose that chance, be proactive. Set the agenda now for your future business growth. Don’t let the events set the agenda.

My advice? Make a “Master Checklist” for the onboarding process. As a business owner, you may have this process in your head, but getting these steps down on paper to share with your employees is important for that growth. But always challenge the process, never be content. Always be open to feedback. Keep thinking what could make it better. These processes are just the skeleton of the client/employee experience. Don’t think the processes you put in place are the end all, be all either. Always try to improve. Think through the processes and write them down. Challenge yourself. Keep up with demand. Be proactive. Grow regardless.

 

Justin Martinelli is a Project Specialist at entreQuest and works closely with all eQ team members to provide employees and clients with remarkable experiences.

Posted in Grow Regardless, growth, scalability, scale | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

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